Mong Palatino

blogging about the philippine left and southeast asian politics since 2004

About

@mongster is a manila-based activist, former philippine legislator, and blogger/analyst of asia-pacific affairs.

Archive for the 'economy' Category

Written for The Diplomat Policymakers are debating the social impact of private tuition or tutoring classes which have proliferated in recent years. The numbers are simply staggering: More than 90 percent of primary students are enrolled in after-school tuition centers while parents spend an estimated $680 million annually on tutoring services. Soon, it will be […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Southeast Asia Scales Down on Subsidies

Friday, July 26th, 2013

Written for The Diplomat Several Southeast Asian countries have begun scaling down the subsidies they are providing to key sectors of their economies. Last month, the Thai government confirmed that it will soon decrease the rice price subsidy it gives to farmers. In Indonesia, the parliament approved a revised budget that lowered the fuel subsidy. […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Populist Economics in Southeast Asia

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

Written for The Diplomat Governments are spending vast sums to reduce crushing poverty. While the cause is a noble one the reasoning and approach may be faulty. Populist economics is on the rise in Southeast Asia. Politicians have been actively adopting policies that aim to impress upon the poor that governments are doing something, however […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Frustrating Philippines Rice Crisis

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Written for The Diplomat Rice is the staple food in Southeast Asia and in many parts of the world. But it’s not just a food that fulfills hunger. Rice has enriched the cultures of many Asian societies. In Thailand, asking, ‘Have you eaten rice today?’ is a way of saying, ‘How are you?’ In Vietnam […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Philippine employment statistics 2010

Thursday, February 3rd, 2011

I was compelled to gather some employment statistics when I was invited to discuss the youth situation in a university job fair last week. I got a copy of the Department of Labor and Employment’s Project Jobsfit August 2010 study on employment prospects in the Philippines. Here are some of the interesting and relevant findings […]

Read the rest of this entry »

“Industrial peace of the grave”

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

In 1986 there were 581 factory strikes and lockouts in the Philippines. Last year the number of actual strikes went down to five. Using this data, the labor department of the government claims there is now industrial peace in the country. Is this true? Labor groups were quick to dismiss this assertion by describing the […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Save More

Sunday, September 6th, 2009

As of June 30, 2009, Henry Sy’s SM has 102 stores composed of 34 department stores, 41 supermarkets (16 SaveMore branches), 13 hypermarkets, and 14 Makro wholesale outlets. For the rest of the year, SM plans to open one new SM Supermarket, 7 SaveMore outlets, 6 SM Hypermarkets, and 2 SM Department Stores. SM is […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Dim prospects for Philippine BPO sector

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009

Dim prospects for Philippine BPO sector The Philippines’ business process outsourcing sector has been a major contributor to the country’s economy in terms of revenues and job generation. There are more than 600 BPO companies operating in the Philippines which employ almost 400,000 young workers. Last year, the industry generated US$6.1 billion in revenues. The […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Swine flu, economics, decollectivization

Thursday, June 25th, 2009

The global economic crash continues to terrorize the world everyday. Banks fail, jobs disappear, wealth becomes fictitious. The pillars of the global economic system are now exposed as lacking in firm foundation. The new world order is now heralded as a global disorder. This sudden unraveling of the inconvenient truths about the capitalist economic system […]

Read the rest of this entry »